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The Life of Menkaura

Menkaura
        (Menkaure Menkawra Menkawre Mycerinos Mycerinus Mykérinos Mycérinos Mykerinus Mycerinus
        Mykérinus Mycérinus
        from hieroglyphic mn kA.w ra = `The Kas of Re are established,
        with the Horus-name Hr kA X.t = `Horus, (whose) body is that of a bull',
        and the Nebti-name kA nb.tj = `The bull of the Two Ladies',
        and the Golden name bik nbw nTr(j) = `The divine golden falcon')
was the builder of the 3rd pyramid at Giza. He ruled during the 4th dynasty, 2532-2504 BCE. Historians report that he was a fair and kind man. Earlier pharaohs had closed the temples to the common people. Menkaura felt that the beauty and power of the temples should be enjoyed by all, not just the nobility. As a result, he promptly reopened them to the public. This made him well loved by the common people.
His parents were Khafra and Khamerenebty I. He had three queens, all of which he built small pyramids for. His chief queen was Khamerenebty II. He is known to have had at least three children. His oldest son, Khuenre, died before Menkaura left the throne. Thus his second son, Shepseskaf, became Pharaoh. He also had a daughter named Khentkawes. There has been much debate over why Menkaura's pyramid is so much smaller than Khafra's and Khufu's. Some believe that the economy was declining and a small pyramid was all that could be afforded. While others disagree, saying there is no proof of this. Some assert that it was intentionally small. It was, along with other pyramids built during this time, meant to reflect the shape of the constellation of Orion. The three pyramids at Giza are said to be the earthly belt of Orion. This not only explains the size of Menkaura's pyramid, but also the odd alignment.



The Love of Menkaura
The Union of the Two Worlds


Menkaura & Khamerenebti II

The Riddle of Menkaura



Egyptian Society and Religion

Although we look these days at everything in isolation, for the Ancient Egyptians this would have been unthinkable. What we now term as a holistic approach to life was normal for the Egyptians.
In fact, the holistic approach was very common in our own Western culture until the Industrial Revolution. At the end of the Eighteenth Century, life became fragmented into production and consumption, supply and demand. Many people whose life was on the land, and who were intimately acquainted with every aspect of life as a cohesive and living whole (hence holistic) were made redundant by the new machines.
The only work, and life, available to them meant going from the land to the towns and cities. Instead of producing to meet their own needs, and then either bartering or selling their surplus from a good year's harvest, they were forced into wage slavery -- to total dependence upon those who controlled the means of production.
In Ancient Egyptian times there was no wage slavery, rather a communal approach to life, and a very stable society. Everyone had their place, their tasks, and co-operated with others to ensure survival, peace and prosperity. The Biblical notion of enforced slavery to the Pharaohs seems to be exaggerated, testified by the meteoric rise in status of the Prophet Yusuf (Joseph) and his clan.
Knowledge of the logistics of building a pyramid like those at the Memphite Necropolis at Giza puts shame to the idea that they were built by ill-treated slave labour. The craftsmanship is of the highest degree -- it is still a mystery to this day how the pyramids were built.


The Sun - Die Sonne
Mehr über Religion und Kultur und Welt des Alten Ägypten
suche auf der Homepage einen geheimen Eingang zur Sonne !
on the Homepage search for a secret entry to the Sun !




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